what is strawberry apple juice?

Tags: Red Jacket

"I could write a list starting in elementary school of all the people we grew up with who have been killed."

greetingsfromjan:

Chapati
A chapati/chapo is a flat, unleavened bread with some resemblance to a pita or tortilla. It’s usually eaten for breakfast, can be served cut up or as a side dish (particularly with any sort of curry/dipping sauce). In Uganda it’s also sold rolled up and filled with an omelet as a so called “Rolex”.Dough (4 portions, difficulty level: rookie)1 cup of flour1 tablespoon of oil (preferably olive)1 teaspoon of salt dissolved in half a cup of water  Stir everything together and knead it until you get a smooth dough that is elastic but not sticky.  Portion the dough into balls of desired size (somewhere between the size of a ping-pong and tennis ball). Pro tip: For evenly round chapos knead every ball into a snake, then roll it up. Do this for all the balls.Wrap a plastic bag around two plates to hold the made chapos. This will keep them warm and also prevents them from getting dry.Preparation (difficulty level: can be tricky)On a lightly floured surface, use a floured rolling pin to roll out a ball of dough. Add oil in a pan and set it on medium heat. Initial procedure Put the chapo into the pan and let it rest for a short while. Rotate it several times to allow the oil to distribute evenly and to impress bystanders. Use your hand for this. Check with a spoon underneath and turn the chapo over before it develops brown patches. Main procedure (repeat once) Let it rest for a few seconds, then add oil with the spoon all around the pan’s walls. Lift the chapo to allow some oil to flow into the center. Rotate the chapo a few times. After approx. half a minute check underneath if golden-brown patches have appeared. Before those patches turn black turn the chapo over. Repeat procedure for the flipped side. While preparing the chapo roll out another ball of dough for the next one. If the current one looks ready, put it between the plates. Repeat with the next chapo until finished. Enjoy!

grew up with this and i can attest that it is akin to Lembas bread

greetingsfromjan:

Chapati

A chapati/chapo is a flat, unleavened bread with some resemblance to a pita or tortilla. It’s usually eaten for breakfast, can be served cut up or as a side dish (particularly with any sort of curry/dipping sauce). In Uganda it’s also sold rolled up and filled with an omelet as a so called “Rolex”.

Dough (4 portions, difficulty level: rookie)
1 cup of flour
1 tablespoon of oil (preferably olive)
1 teaspoon of salt dissolved in half a cup of water

Stir everything together and knead it until you get a smooth dough that is elastic but not sticky.

Portion the dough into balls of desired size (somewhere between the size of a ping-pong and tennis ball). Pro tip: For evenly round chapos knead every ball into a snake, then roll it up. Do this for all the balls.

Wrap a plastic bag around two plates to hold the made chapos. This will keep them warm and also prevents them from getting dry.

Preparation (difficulty level: can be tricky)
On a lightly floured surface, use a floured rolling pin to roll out a ball of dough. Add oil in a pan and set it on medium heat.

Initial procedure Put the chapo into the pan and let it rest for a short while. Rotate it several times to allow the oil to distribute evenly and to impress bystanders. Use your hand for this. Check with a spoon underneath and turn the chapo over before it develops brown patches.

Main procedure (repeat once) Let it rest for a few seconds, then add oil with the spoon all around the pan’s walls. Lift the chapo to allow some oil to flow into the center. Rotate the chapo a few times. After approx. half a minute check underneath if golden-brown patches have appeared. Before those patches turn black turn the chapo over. Repeat procedure for the flipped side.

While preparing the chapo roll out another ball of dough for the next one. If the current one looks ready, put it between the plates. Repeat with the next chapo until finished.

Enjoy!

grew up with this and i can attest that it is akin to Lembas bread

(via so-treu)

philthethrillmusic:

yep

this is what a  road trip represents to me

philthethrillmusic:

yep

this is what a  road trip represents to me

(Source: lluminant, via iamlove24)

jcoleknowsbest:

sourcedumal:

il-tenore-regina:

theresonatingchamber:

nombredeguerra:

blkprtorcn:

vandalyzm:

thechanelmuse:

They. better. get. their. everlasting. life! The one in the blue…She smoothly switches between harmonizer and lead vocalist. Like what?! lol. Sang!

This gave me everything I needed tho

Lord Lawd Lo’d, Yes!!!!

they betta sang!!! nothing like good gospel singing

Yes lord

Once again: I love Black people. 

SANG LADIES!!!! SANG!

sssaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaang!!!

"If I could save the Union without freeing any slave I would do it, and if I could save it by freeing all the slaves I would do it; and if I could save it by freeing some and leaving others alone I would also do that. What I do about slavery, and the colored race, I do because I believe it helps to save the Union."

Abraham Lincoln, to Secretary of State William H. Seward, 1862 (via white-history-month)
Lincoln is a joke. He didn’t care about slavery or slaves well being just money and in extenso power. (via nabyss)

Many black people don’t know that Lincoln was just as bad as the people that enslaved them. What they should teach is the congressmen that passed the declaration.

(via yinx1)

Not shocked.

(via nessanotarized)

(via sweetbloodsomalia)

"First…. Many Indigenous Nations have calendars which have
been counting the years for a very long time. I am aware that
the calendar of the Mohawk Indian Nation has been counting
the winters for over 33,120 years. This pre-dates the so-called
‘land-bridge’ of the Bering Strait theory, unless, of course, the
Bering Strait scientists decide to move their interestingly illusive
time period for “early migration” of Indians back to 40,000 years!
Many American Indian early histories tell of events that took
place on this Turtle continent (North America) long before any
so-called ice age. But, for political reasons, these histories
have been mostly ignored. You see, the Bering Strait, in truth,
is a theory that was born of the politics and propaganda of
early America. In the midst of the American ‘Manifest Destiny’
social climate, the Bering Strait theory provided a ‘scientific’
means to justify the taking of ancestral Indian lands. In short,
the mythical theory eased the conscience, as it was a way for
land hungry immigrants to believe that, because Indian people
were only ‘recent inhabitants’ of this land , it was not really their
‘homeland’. Therefore Indians were, in their minds, not any more
the ‘original people’ of this land than they were. This was, and
still is, the political power of the infamous ‘Bering Strait theory’."

The B.S. (Bering Strait) Myth
By John Two-Hawks

The Bering Strait Theory was made to make colonialism seem less like exploitation.

(via fwoosh2)

at which line did your brain explode?

(Source: nativecircle.com, via sweetbloodsomalia)

"…come celebrate
with me that everyday
something has tried to kill me
and has failed."

— Lucille Clifton (via devilduck)

(via guerrillamamamedicine)