(Source: Spotify)

spacecadet:

We asked some naughty questions in Venice Beach last weekend… teehee. The hosts name is Kamron. She rules. 

my homegirl do things

ashesforjustice:

likehercoffee abluesforbrklyn

you kno im the homie next to him posing but not gettin up

ashesforjustice:

likehercoffee abluesforbrklyn

you kno im the homie next to him posing but not gettin up

(Source: twitterscreencaps)

"I am too far in the future to worry about people who tried to destroy me. I’m going to let them destroy themselves."

— Cece McDonald (via nezua)

(via freshmouthgoddess)

Awesome and scary at the same time.

stylelistics:

Behold Anakin, the only thing greater than yourself #nieceAnaya #uganda meets #boricua #imstealingallhercandyonsight #literallytakingcandyfrombabies #shefakecute #stoptrynastealmyshine #imthebaby #yalldontrememberdinosaurstho (at somewhere over the rainbow)

stylelistics:

Behold Anakin, the only thing greater than yourself #nieceAnaya #uganda meets #boricua #imstealingallhercandyonsight #literallytakingcandyfrombabies #shefakecute #stoptrynastealmyshine #imthebaby #yalldontrememberdinosaurstho (at somewhere over the rainbow)

(Source: Spotify)

what is strawberry apple juice?

Tags: Red Jacket

"I could write a list starting in elementary school of all the people we grew up with who have been killed."

greetingsfromjan:

Chapati
A chapati/chapo is a flat, unleavened bread with some resemblance to a pita or tortilla. It’s usually eaten for breakfast, can be served cut up or as a side dish (particularly with any sort of curry/dipping sauce). In Uganda it’s also sold rolled up and filled with an omelet as a so called “Rolex”.Dough (4 portions, difficulty level: rookie)1 cup of flour1 tablespoon of oil (preferably olive)1 teaspoon of salt dissolved in half a cup of water  Stir everything together and knead it until you get a smooth dough that is elastic but not sticky.  Portion the dough into balls of desired size (somewhere between the size of a ping-pong and tennis ball). Pro tip: For evenly round chapos knead every ball into a snake, then roll it up. Do this for all the balls.Wrap a plastic bag around two plates to hold the made chapos. This will keep them warm and also prevents them from getting dry.Preparation (difficulty level: can be tricky)On a lightly floured surface, use a floured rolling pin to roll out a ball of dough. Add oil in a pan and set it on medium heat. Initial procedure Put the chapo into the pan and let it rest for a short while. Rotate it several times to allow the oil to distribute evenly and to impress bystanders. Use your hand for this. Check with a spoon underneath and turn the chapo over before it develops brown patches. Main procedure (repeat once) Let it rest for a few seconds, then add oil with the spoon all around the pan’s walls. Lift the chapo to allow some oil to flow into the center. Rotate the chapo a few times. After approx. half a minute check underneath if golden-brown patches have appeared. Before those patches turn black turn the chapo over. Repeat procedure for the flipped side. While preparing the chapo roll out another ball of dough for the next one. If the current one looks ready, put it between the plates. Repeat with the next chapo until finished. Enjoy!

grew up with this and i can attest that it is akin to Lembas bread

greetingsfromjan:

Chapati

A chapati/chapo is a flat, unleavened bread with some resemblance to a pita or tortilla. It’s usually eaten for breakfast, can be served cut up or as a side dish (particularly with any sort of curry/dipping sauce). In Uganda it’s also sold rolled up and filled with an omelet as a so called “Rolex”.

Dough (4 portions, difficulty level: rookie)
1 cup of flour
1 tablespoon of oil (preferably olive)
1 teaspoon of salt dissolved in half a cup of water

Stir everything together and knead it until you get a smooth dough that is elastic but not sticky.

Portion the dough into balls of desired size (somewhere between the size of a ping-pong and tennis ball). Pro tip: For evenly round chapos knead every ball into a snake, then roll it up. Do this for all the balls.

Wrap a plastic bag around two plates to hold the made chapos. This will keep them warm and also prevents them from getting dry.

Preparation (difficulty level: can be tricky)
On a lightly floured surface, use a floured rolling pin to roll out a ball of dough. Add oil in a pan and set it on medium heat.

Initial procedure Put the chapo into the pan and let it rest for a short while. Rotate it several times to allow the oil to distribute evenly and to impress bystanders. Use your hand for this. Check with a spoon underneath and turn the chapo over before it develops brown patches.

Main procedure (repeat once) Let it rest for a few seconds, then add oil with the spoon all around the pan’s walls. Lift the chapo to allow some oil to flow into the center. Rotate the chapo a few times. After approx. half a minute check underneath if golden-brown patches have appeared. Before those patches turn black turn the chapo over. Repeat procedure for the flipped side.

While preparing the chapo roll out another ball of dough for the next one. If the current one looks ready, put it between the plates. Repeat with the next chapo until finished.

Enjoy!

grew up with this and i can attest that it is akin to Lembas bread

(via so-treu)